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In-House Collab with Soft Pieces

Our friend Zach Mason (Soft Pieces) drove down to our home in Charlottesville from Rockville, MD to jam and record with us today. We made a big meal of DIY vegan burritos to welcome him.

Zach gave us a noise-making toy that he constructed from a pill bottle, rubber bands, and a contact mic. We named it “Lander”.

Lander

We did a free improv jam. We tried various ways to set constraints such as  “playing with Lander and letting it guide us.” We also used Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt’s Oblique Strategies that Zach brought during our last take. During this take, I was to experiment with the concept of humanization (“free of error”), Carey with frame and edges, and Zach with fakery.

We had a blast! It felt really good to do some serious experimentation.

It looks like we will be playing with Zach sometime in the near future. We’re concocting a performance possibly for the Femfest at Maya Gallery later this fall in Greensboro, NC.

Carey_contactmicZach_setupWendy_feedbackaccordion

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Brainstorming Song Titles

With Pinkos, we were never good with naming tracks. Maybe this has something to do with the abstract sounds and anti-conventional methods of sound-making that Pinkos strive for. But the process of naming happens with much ease with GX. Yesterday after practice, Carey and I looked at our materials and began discoursing (briefly) about the meanings of these songs to us.

With the piece featuring feedback as a sound-making method and an aesthetic, we cited the Belgian feminist literary critic Lucy Irigaray. With the title of “Irigaray”, we deploy feedback centralizing its quality of non-distinguishable dynamics between two or more sources. We borrow from Écriture féminine to use feedback to create a kind of non-singular subjectivity against the masculinist subjectivity written into the history of text (in the western hemisphere). Emphasizing the body, this piece outputs sound from bodily-engaged gestures.

With the “disco noise” piece, we’re calling it “n+1 to the Floor.” This titles brings us back to the mid-1970s disco era, referencing the persistant pulse of club music articulated by the bass drum, also know as “four to the floor.” Implementing this idea while inserting math-y (rock) rhythmic elements and randomizing noisy timbres (via bit reduction) into the system, we bring forth a kind of semi-rationalized aesthetics highlighting the tension between structure and freedom. We call it “n+1”. The guitar part of the piece also uses “chicken scratch”, a disco technique used by rhythm guitarists who mute the sound by pressing against the strings with the palm.

Irigaray

Ideas are ideas. Practice makes perfect.

Disco Noise, Anyone?

Carey and I are prepping for Queer Noise (6/6 @ Pyramid Atlantic). We’re trying out some ideas about rhythm, pulse, and the body that have been simmering. Any takers for some “disco noise”? We will post some work-in-progress tracks soon.